I Need Help

Note: While your concern is very important to us, NAPW does not have the resources or expertise to assist everyone from whom we receive questions. We’ve compiled this list of the most common questions we receive in order to direct you to a resource that can better help you with your specific concern. The views of the referral organizations do not necessarily reflect the views of NAPW, and NAPW is not responsible for the advice or treatment given by any of the resources listed. We will continue to update resources as we receive more information. If your question is not listed, or if you find a broken link or more helpful resources or information, please feel free to contact us using our webform.
  • Women and Prison has a long list of general resources on their website.
  • Although Legal Momentum can no longer offer legal support, their help center has a directory of organizations and resources in the following categories: Child/Teens; Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault; Education; Employment; Family Law; Immigrant Women
  • HIV Law Project - Works with low-income, HIV-positive communities. Provides advanced advocacy and leadership trainings for HIV-positive women, community legal education, technical assistance to other service providers, and social support services for clients. To schedule an appointment for a legal consultant, people living with HIV/AIDS can call 212-577-3001.
  • Women’s Law Project – based in Philadelphia, PA, but has a comprehensive resource list.
  • The Door - Provides a wide range of services to meet the needs of New York City’s youth aged 12-21 (college advertisement and tutoring, counseling, creative arts, English language, foster care, GED, health and dental services, jobs and internships, leadership, legal and immigration services, LGBTQ, recreation, runaway and homeless youth, sexual health and birth control, and supportive housing).
I’m pregnant and need a lawyer for a situation unrelated to my pregnancy. Where can I find one?

  • Law Help - Helps moderate and low income people find free legal aid programs in their communities and answer questions about their legal rights.
  • The American Bar Association’s Consumer Guide to Legal Help, where you can search for resources in your state, is a useful site.
  • If you are unable to find a pro-bono or low-cost lawyer, the websites Lawyers.com and FindLaw can help you locate an attorney.
  • iLawyer provides referrals for lawyers in New York, California, Connecticut, Houston, Texas, Kentucky, and Southern Indiana.

I was fired, denied medical leave, or have experienced discrimination in my workplace because I’m a woman/pregnant/have family responsibilities. What should I do? Where can I find a low-cost or pro bono lawyer who specializes in employment rights?

Pregnancy discrimination in the workplace is a serious and ongoing concern, but we are unfortunately unable to represent clients in employment matters. The resources provided below are for reference only:

General

  • U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission - information about pregnancy discrimination.
  • You may be covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) - find more information from the US Department of Labor.
  • National Employment Lawyers Association - “Find a Lawyer” search engine.
  • Legal Momentum: The Women’s Legal Defense and Education Fund. Due to funding cuts it can no longer take on new cases, but has a variety of publications available to download for free on their website.
  • WorkLife Law: a Center of UC Hastings College of the Law. The WorkLife Law Hotline is a free service designed to help parents and other family caregivers who may be facing employment discrimination because of their family responsibilities. You can email them at hotline@worklifelaw.org or call their hotline at (415) 703-8276.
  • National Women's Law Center (NWLC) (202-588-5180) works on laws and policies for women and families. In collaboration with A Better Balance, ACLU, CA Women's Law Center, Equal Rights Advocates, Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center, Legal Momentum, and National Partnership for Women and Families, NWLC is working to pass the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act.

New York

  • New York State Division of Human Rights - explains how to file a complaint in New York.
  • Law firm Outten & Golden - all areas of employment law. Offices in New York, NY (212-245-1000) and Stamford, CT (203-363-7888), Chicago, IL (312-809-7010) and San Francisco, CA (415-638-8800)
  • A Better Balance: The Work & Family Legal Center, based in New York, NY (212-430-5982). Issues include sick leave, family leave, fairness in the workplace, and valuing care work. You can also call to set up an appointment to attend their Families at Work legal clinic.
    Also see A Better Balance’s “Know Your Rights” Guide
  • New York Employment Law Project: Legal Aid Society - provides representation, advice and community education to low wage and unemployed workers. To obtain an appointment from the Employment Law Project, call 888-218-6974.
  • New York City Bar Association: Legal Hotline - a free advice hotline for low-income NYC residents on civil legal issues, such as divorce and family matters, consumer law, and public benefits. Provides referrals, but does not provide lawyers for representation. Eligibility is based upon income. (English: 212-626-7383; español: 212-626-7374).
  • MFY Legal Services - provides free legal assistance to residents of New York City (212-417-3700). Provides referrals to a variety of organizations.
  • New York Civil Liberties Union To receive legal assistance in the state of New York, visit their website or call 212-607-3300. To receive legal assistance elsewhere in the United States and Puerto Rico, find your local ACLU affiliate.
  • South Brooklyn Legal Services- An organization that offers legal advocacy for people living in Brooklyn. The organization provides legal services for child care, consumer law, employment/unemployment, family law/ domestic violence, foreclosure prevention, government benefits, HIV, housing, pension benefits, special education, SSI/ disability rights, and taxes. 718-855-0733

-domestic violence, abuse, rape and sexual assault

I’m pregnant and have been abused/raped/sexually assaulted. Where can I go for medical help/counseling/housing/support?

(Also see Homelessness - Shelters for pregnant women)

  • National Domestic Violence Hotline - 1-800-799-SAFE(7233) or TTY 1-800-787-3224.
  • The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) - 1-800-656-HOPE(4673)
  • Legal Momentum - Website with a comprehensive list of domestic violence and sexual assault resources
  • Legal Voice - based in Washington state, the volunteers at Legal Voice give information about Washington law, referrals to community services and attorneys in private practice, assistance with problem-solving, and self help materials. They can be reached at 206-682-9552 or toll free at 888-201-1014.
  • Sanctuary for Families (New York) - serves domestic violence victims, sex trafficking victims, and their children. 212-349-6009
  • New York State’s 24-hour Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-942-6906 (English and español/multi-language accessibility).
  • Safe Horizon - the largest victims’ services center in the United States.
    800-621-HOPE(4673) : Domestic violence hotline
    1-212-227-3000 : Rape and sexual abuse hotline
    866-604-5350 : TDD phone number for all hotlines
  • NYPD Sex Crimes Report Line: 212-267-RAPE(7273)
  • New York Asian Women’s Center – support programs, shelter services, education to overcome domestic violence and other forms of abuse. 24/7 hotline in 15 different Asian languages and dialects. 1-888-888-7702

– unnecessary c-section; medical interventions; midwives; selecting a care provider; breast and formula feeding

I’m unhappy with the maternity care I received. How can I file a complaint?

  • Unhappy With Your Maternity Care, File a Complaint - a step-by-step guide created by Citizens for Midwifery detailing to file a complaint with your state medical board if unhappy with maternity care.

I had a c-section and am looking for support.

I want to breastfeed my baby. Who can I go to for some information/education/support/encouragement?

  • La Leche League International - an international, nonprofit, nonsectarian organization dedicated to providing education, information, support, and encouragement to women who want to breastfeed.
  • Kellymom- a breastfeeding and parenting resource website. The website also provides a directory for lactation consultants.

How should I plan for my pregnancy, choose a caregiver, and learn about my options for labor and birth?

  • Hospital Maternity-Related Procedures and Practices Statistics (NY) - At this website, you can select any county and then hospital in New York to see, in relation to the state average, the number of vaginal and cesarean births performed, the percentage of women who breast fed, were attended by a midwife, required the use of forceps, etc. This is a useful tool for anyone deciding which hospital to give birth in in New York.
  • Childbirth Connection - information and resources on planning for pregnancy, choosing a caregiver, labor and birth, and the postpartum period.
  • Coalition for Improving Maternity Services - a coalition of individuals and national organizations with concern for the care and well-being of mothers, babies, and families that promotes a wellness model of maternity care that will improve birth outcomes and substantially reduce costs.
  • Choices in Childbirth - helps women make informed choices about where, how and with whom to birth.
  • Mothers Naturally “Choosing Your Midwife” - questions to ask your midwife to be able to make an informed choice.

Where can I find a midwife?

-Interventions, child abuse allegations, hospital threat, parental support

If you are dealing with Child Protective Services and need help (in the form of legal aid, support, or information about how the system works) use this list to find resources in your state.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1PgM43epbtgQtMlsgl1FdRG48BkiPqVib8SbMsCExFMI/pub

- education rights, sex education, pregnancy, parenting, breastfeeding, education access & discrimination

I experienced discrimination in education because I’m pregnant or parenting. Where can I receive support and learn more about my rights as a pregnant or parenting student or young person?

  • Girl-Mom- A website that provides peer support for young mothers. The website includes a forums section as well as a features section with articles, essays, and stories.
  • National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education- organizes around many issues, including rights of pregnant and parenting students. Contact the NCWGE Chair Lisa Maatz at maatzl@aauw.org or (202) 785-7793.
  • Legal Momentum: The Women’s Legal Defense and Education Fund. Due to funding cuts it can no longer take on new cases, but has a variety of publications, including information specifically about education access and discrimination, available to download for free on their website.

Also check the non-discrimination policies of local and state boards of education for additional resources.

Are there parenting education programs for low-income mothers, fathers, and families?

  • Sistas on the Rise- NYC-based reproductive justice organizing and development programs for low income mothers of color ages 13-21. 718-991-6003; PO Box 740581 Bronx, NY 10474.
  • Legal Momentum: The Women’s Legal Defense and Education Fund. Due to funding cuts it can no longer take on new cases, but has a variety of publications, including information specifically about education access and discrimination, available to download for free on their website.
  • The Brooklyn Young Mothers Collective - An organization in Brooklyn that helps disadvantaged young mothers by connecting them to schooling and offering reproductive health education and leadership trainings. 612-888-BYMC (2962).
  • Inwood House – school-based pregnancy program, providing training on parenting, arrange after-care plans, young fathers program. 212-861-4400

I want to go back to school but am finding it difficult while pregnant/caring for my family/maintaining another job.

-treatment, facts, concerns about drug use during pregnancy, drug tested without consent

Where can I get drug treatment?

What are the drug policies in my state?

  • Drug Policy Alliance - Covers a broad range of issues on drug and drug policy reform. Website includes facts about drugs as well as how to take action with regard to the politics of drugs in any state.
  • NORML – This organization works to reform marijuana laws; gives insight into the marijuana laws that apply in each state.

I’m a medical marijuana patient. Where can I learn more about my rights?

  • Americans for Safe Access - Advocates safe and legal access to medical marijuana for therapeutic use and general research.
  • NORML – This organization works to reform marijuana laws; gives insight into the marijuana laws that apply in each state.
  • North Carolina Pregnancy & Opioid Exposure Project Their “Pregnancy and Opioid Exposure: Guidance for North Carolina” publication supports the use of best practices by professionals in North Carolina.

– counseling, hotlines, & general information

Where can I go to discuss my options for pregnancy, prenatal care, and receive education and support?

  • All-Options- If you need someone to talk to about your experiences with pregnancy, parenting, abortion, and adoption, All-Options has volunteer counselors staffing their hotline. 1-888-493-0092. Hours: Monday-Friday 10:00am-1:00am, Saturday-Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm EST. They also have a number of resources on their website.
  • Coalition for Improving Maternity Services: Mother Friendly Childbirth Initiative (MFCI) - A North Carolina-based advocacy organization that promotes a wellness model of maternity care that improves birth outcomes and reduces costs. 866-424-3635
  • Planned Parenthood - Find your local health center.

I’m pregnant and thinking about my delivery options. Where and how is the best way to give birth?

  • Choices in Childbirth - Helps women make informed choices about where, how and with whom to birth. On their website you can find a “National Guide to Healthy Birth,” “New York Guide to Healthy Birth,” and “Philadelphia Guide to Healthy Birth.”
  • Coalition for Improving Maternity Services: Mother Friendly Childbirth Initiative (MFCI) - A North Carolina-based advocacy organization that promotes a wellness model of maternity care that improves birth outcomes and reduces costs. 866-424-3635

How can I prevent an unnecessary cesarean section?

  • International Cesarean Awareness Network and VBAC Information. Includes how to prevent an unnecessary cesarean, vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC), how to find resources in your community, information about ICAN, and how to become a part of ICAN.

I’m thinking about having an abortion but need a referral to a clinic. Where can I go?

  • National Abortion Federation- National association for abortion providers with extensive information about pregnancy options and resources. NAF has two hotline numbers, one for information and financial assistance (1-800-772-9100); the other for clinical referrals (877-257-0012). See their website for the hotline hours.

I decided to carry my pregnancy to term, but I don’t want to or can’t keep my baby. What should I do now?

  • National Safe Haven Alliance - Each state has a law in place to allow an unharmed infant to be relinquished to the proper authorities, no questions asked. The National Safe Haven Alliance works with states to promote these laws and increase public awareness that options exist. You can find one near you with their online locator. Hotline: 1-888-510-BABY(2229)

I had an abortion, and I need someone to talk to.

  • Exhale – A confidential post-abortion counseling talkline. The website also has post-abortion resources for women, their significant others, and health care providers.
    Talkline number: 1-866-4 EXHALE(39-4253). See their website for hotline hours.
  • All-Options- If you need someone to talk to about your experiences with pregnancy, parenting, abortion, and adoption, All-Options has volunteer counselors staffing their hotline. 1-888-493-0092. Visit their website to view the hotline hours as well as other resources.

-problems with health insurance, medical and dental clinics

I need medical or dental care but I don’t have health insurance. Can I still receive medical care? Where can I get more information? Where can I find a free or low-cost clinic?

Clinics in the New York metropolitan area

  • The New York City Free Clinic- The clinic provides many health services, including disease prevention/screening, vaccinations, and radiology. The clinic has extensive women’s health services, but no prenatal care. The clinic can also refer patients to other health resources. Anyone who is 18 years or older and uninsured is eligible. 16 E. 16th St, New York, NY 10003. 212-206-5200.
  • Brooklyn Free Clinic- Checkups, health maintenance, sick visits, preventative care, insurance screenings. The clinic can also make referrals and suggest other resources. Anyone who is 18 years or older and uninsured is eligible. 840 Lefferts Avenue, Brooklyn NY 11203. 347-688-6655.
  • Bedford Stuyvesant Family Health Center - Dentistry, women’s health, family planning, substance abuse, pediatrics, prenatal care, and many other services. Anyone is eligible to access services. 1456 Fulton St. Brooklyn, NY 11216. 718-636-4500.
  • Community Healthcare Network- Multiple locations. Primary care, HIV care, reproductive health care, dentistry, mental health care, and many other services. The center charges for services on a sliding scale based on family size, income, and insurance. CHN accepts many types of insurance (public, private, etc.) and can also make payment plans with patients to meet their individual needs. Anyone can access services, regardless of immigration or financial status.

Manhattan Locations:

  • Helen B. Atkinson Health Center 81 W. 115th St. New York, NY 10026 (212) 426-0088.
  • Community League Health Center 1996 Amsterdam Ave New York, NY 10032 (212) 781-7979
  • Catherine M. Abate Health Center (formerly the Downtown Health Center) 150 Essex St. New York, NY 10002 (212) 477- 1120

Bronx Locations:

  • Bronx Health Center 975 Westchester Ave Bronx, NY 10459 (718) 320- 4466

Brooklyn Locations:

  • CABS Health Center 94-98 Manhattan Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11206 (718) 388-0390
  • Caribbean House Health Center 1167 Nostrand Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11225. (718) 778- 0198
  • Dr. Betty Shabazz Health Center 999 Blake Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11208 (718) 277-8303

Queens Locations:

  • Queens Health Center 97-04 Sutphin Boulevard Jamaica, NY 11435 (718) 657-7088
  • Long Island City Health Center 36-11 21st St Long Island City, NY 11106 (718) 482-7772

Where can I find a homeless shelter or women’s shelter? Are there any programs specifically for pregnant women, foster children, teens, families, formerly incarcerated women, or people battling addiction?

Homeless shelters:

  • The Homeless Shelter Directory provides homeless shelters and homeless service organizations - search by state.
  • NY Department of Homeless Services (DHS)-Works to prevent homelessness in NYC. Telephone: 212-361-8000. In an emergency you can dial 311. This number allows you to get help, including family eviction prevention services.
  • Urban Justice Center - New York City organization that engages in legal services, advocacy, community education, and organizing around many issues, including homelessness. They have a homelessness outreach and prevention project with a website that includes information on how to access legal clinics. For even more information, call 646-602-5600.

Women’s shelters:

  • The Women’s Shelter Directory - search by state.
  • Women in Need, Inc. - An organization that provides housing to homeless women in NYC. Telephone: 212-695-4758. Address: 115 W. 31st St, 7th Floor, New York, New York 10001. Email: Info@women-in-need.org
  • Providence House - An organization in Brooklyn that provides support to homeless, abused, and formerly incarcerated women. The organization operates both transitional and permanent residences. Telephone: 718-455-0197. Address: 703 Lexington Ave Brooklyn, NY 11221

Shelters for mothers and children:

  • The Good Counsel Home - Located in New Jersey, provides shelter for pregnant women and mothers with children. They also have a 24/7 hotline and can refer women to other programs. Pregnancy helpline: 1-800-723-8331
  • First Step Home - provides shelter to pregnant women and mothers who are battling addictions in Cincinnati, Ohio. Also provides other resources to help combat the addiction.

Shelters for pregnant women:

  • Prevention Assistance and Temporary Housing Office (PATH) - Helps NYC families who do not have housing. Single pregnant women, pregnant couples, or parent/grandparents with a pregnant child 21 years of age or over must go in-person to the PATH Office in the Bronx, which is open 24/7. 151 East 151 St., Bronx, NY 10451. (917) 521–3900 or 311.
  • The Good Counsel Home - Located in New Jersey, provides shelter for pregnant women and mothers with children. They also have a 24/7 hotline and can refer women to other programs. Pregnancy helpline: 800-723-8331
  • Lexi House - provides shelter and other help to women who are pregnant and homeless in Alabama.
  • First Step Home - provides shelter to pregnant women and mothers who are battling addictions in Cincinnati, Ohio. Also provides other resources to help combat addiction.

Shelters for formerly incarcerated women:

  • Hour Children - An organization in Queens that works with incarcerated and formally incarcerated women and their families. Their community programs include supportive housing, counseling, day care, mentoring, and a food pantry. Telephone: 718-433-4724. Address: 36-11 12th St., Long Island City, NY 11106.
  • Providence House -An organization in Brooklyn that provides support to homeless, abused, and formerly incarcerated women. The organization operates both transitional and permanent residences. Telephone: 718-455-0197. Address: 703 Lexington Ave Brooklyn, NY 11221.

Shelters for women with addictions:

  • First Step Home - Provides shelter to pregnant women and mothers who are battling addictions in Cincinnati, Ohio. Also provides other resources to help combat addiction.
  • The Alabama Women’s Resource Network (Alabama) - Offers support for incarcerated women and women not in prison, including family reunification and parole preparation workshops. Also has a number of resources on their website.
  • A New Way of Life Re-Entry Project (California) - Based in Los Angeles, this organization provides housing and reentry support for women and children. Also engages in political advocacy and holds occasional leadership trainings. 323-563-3575
  • The Center for Young Women’s Development (California) - Based in San Francisco, this organization supports young women who have had involvement with the juvenile justice system. Offers paid internships to low-income women to build resumes and leadership skills, “Stayin Out of the System” seminars, support groups, case management and courtroom advocacy, etc. 415-703-8800
  • Chicago Legal Advocacy for Incarcerated Mothers (CLAIM) (Chicago) - Visible Voices, the central force behind CLAIM’s advocacy work, is a peer support and advocacy program run entirely by women with a history of criminal justice involvement. 312-738-CGLA (2452)
  • Power Inside (Baltimore) - Serves women impacted by incarceration, street life and abuse. Offers group counseling, re-entry and aftercare, street outreach, and has a drop-in center.
  • The Correctional Association of New York - ReConnect Leadership Training Program - A 12 week leadership training program for formerly incarcerated women who want to change the criminal justice system. For more information contact Andrea B. Williams, ReConnect program director, at 212-254-5700 ex. 338.
  • The Church of Gethsemane (Brooklyn) - A church created by and for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated persons and their families. See their website for more information about Project Connect and their Re-Entry Peer Support Group.
  • Women on the Rise Telling Her Story (WORTH) (New York) - An advocacy/consultant group comprised of formerly and incarcerated women. Has a project called Sista Circle that works to strengthen leadership development skills and educates the community and policymakers about the impact of incarceration on women. 646-918-6858.
  • The Women’s Advocacy Project - the Women’s Prison Association (New York) - By providing education on substantive issues and training in advocacy skills, the Women’s Advocacy Project equips women with criminal justice histories to make an impact on policy formation – in housing, health care, child services, employment, sentencing, etc. 646-292-7740.
  • The Women’s Prison Association (WAP) (New York) - Offers residential and family services, reentry services, and neighborhood-based services in East New York.
  • The Innocence Project - A national litigation and public policy organization dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals through DNA testing and reforming the criminal justice system.
  • Hour Children - An organization in Queens that works with incarcerated and formally incarcerated women and their families. Their community programs include supportive housing, counseling, day care, mentoring, and a food pantry. Telephone: 718-433-4724. Address: 36-11 12th St., Long Island City, NY 11106.
  • Providence House -An organization in Brooklyn that provides support to homeless, abused, and formerly incarcerated women. The organization operates both transitional and permanent residences. Telephone: 718-455-0197. Address: 703 Lexington Ave Brooklyn, NY 11221.
  • Families for Justice as Healing - Organizes formerly incarcerated women to join the movement toward creating alternatives to mass incarceration. Our membership advocates for community wellness, with women as a focus, and rejects the current U.S. drug policies that prioritize criminalization and incarceration. We believe that if we are serious about eradicating drug related illness, crime and violence we must commit to the evidence based solutions that address poverty, addiction and trauma. Telephone: (617) 905-2026. Address: P.O. Box 14 Boston, MA 02121.
  • National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women - provides resources and advocacy for battered women charged with crimes related to their battering. Aside from individualized technical assistance, they also provide training seminars for members of the criminal justice and advocacy communities, and for the general public, regarding the unique experience of battered women defendants. Telephone: 215-351-0010 or toll free 800-903-0111 x3.
  • The Prison Birth Project (Massachusetts)- “provides support, advocacy, and leadership training with women and trans* people at the intersection of the criminal justice system and parenthood.” Offers doula support, personal advocacy, education in childbirth, and breastfeeding support to individuals enrolled in program. Email: collective@theprisonbirthproject.org.

I’m an immigrant to the United States. Is there an organization that works specifically with immigrants?

  • American Gateways (Central Texas)- an organization providing legal and educational services for immigrants to navigate the U.S. immigration system. They provide free or low cost direct legal representation for immigrants in Central Texas. Telephone: 512-478-0546.
  • The National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project - Offers trainings, technical assistance, public policy advocacy, and conducts research to assist a wide range of professionals whose work affects immigrant women and children. Telephone: 202-274-4457.
  • Immigration Equality - national advocacy organization focused on “equality under immigration law for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT), and HIV-positive individuals.” In addition to providing up-to-date information and resources about immigration, the organization’s pro-bono asylum project assists LGBT and HIV-positive asylum seekers to find free or low-cost legal representation. Telephone: 212-714-2904.
  • Center for Gender and Refugee Studies (CGRS) - provides legal expertise and resources to attorneys representing women asylum-seekers fleeing gender related harm. Telephone: 415-565-477.
  • Immigrant Services Directory: A National Guide of Service Providers - American Civil Liberties Union- A guide of immigration service providers by state providing assistance at low or no cost.

I ran into some financial trouble and am struggling to support my family. Is there any way to get a loan to help me through this?

  • Modest Needs - Grant programs are designed PRIMARILY to assist individuals and families who generally are able to pay their monthly bills with no help from anyone, who don't qualify for conventional types of social or charitable assistance, and who are facing a financial crisis because they've encountered a single, unexpected expense they just can't afford on their own. Also has a user-contributed database of helpful organizations and programs (search by state).
  • Sanctuary for Families - Economic Empowerment Program helps domestic violence survivors become self-sufficient in the aftermath of abuse. 212-349-6009.

I’m having trouble finding a job. Is there an organization that can help me?

  • Brooklyn Young Mothers’ Collective - While this organization focuses mostly on providing and encouraging education, it also helps its members to find employment by posting job opportunities. 612-888-BYMC (2962)

I’m pregnant and went to a crisis pregnancy center to discuss my options, but they told me that abortion is dangerous, unsafe, and that I’d regret getting one. Is this true?

  • From CPC Watch: “Crisis Pregnancy Centers (CPCs), also called pregnancy resource centers, are anti-abortion centers that use deceptive tactics to reach out to women who are considering abortion. They promise free pregnancy tests, ultrasounds, even baby supplies; however, once inside, women are subjected to an array of false and misleading information regarding their reproductive options. CPCs are not medical clinics, but instead an appendage of the anti-choice camp with a mission to enact control over a women's bodies and limit decisions. Many staff, no medical professionals at all. With over 4000 CPCs operational in the U.S., it's likely that thousands of women have, through no fault of their own, fallen victim to one of the most hidden threats to reproductive freedom today.”
  • A local Planned Parenthood office may offer affordable or free options for after-abortion counseling or refer you to another provider. Find your local office here.
  • You can also contact Legal Voice to share your story about dealing with a crisis pregnancy center. While this organization is more oriented towards cases in Washington, the forum is not only for people living in the state.