Petition Filed Today Seeking U.S. Supreme Court Review of Unprecedented South Carolina Decision Treating a Woman Who Suffered A Stillbirth as a Murderer

May 27, 2003
MEDIA ADVISORY Contact: 917-921-7421
FOR TUESDAY, May 27th, 2003

On May 27, 2003 counsel for Regina McKnight filed a petition with U.S. Court Supreme Court requesting review of a South Carolina Supreme Court decision that effectively rewrote the state's homicide by child abuse law to permit prosecution and conviction of pregnant women who experience stillbirths.

Controversial “cash-for-sterilization” California group comes to New York

NAPW Press Release, PRESS RELEASE, October 7, 2002

New York City, NY - CRACK (Children Require A Caring Kommunity) is a Southern California-based organization that "offers" $200 in cash to any woman or man who uses drugs or alcohol in exchange for their willingness to undergo sterilization or take long-term birth control.

National Advocates for Pregnant Women Condemns C.R.A.C.K. Campaign Targeting Methadone Clinics

National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW) released an open letter to Barbara Harris, executive director of Children Requiring a Caring Kommunity (C.R.A.C.K.) and Project Prevention, condemning a misleading statement by the organization regarding methadone treatment during pregnancy.

Pregnant Drug Users: Scapegoats of the Reagan/Bush and Clinton Era Economics

By: Sheigla Murphy and Paloma Sales

INTRODUCTION

In this paper we present analyses of two National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded studies entitled, "An Ethnographic Study of Pregnancy and Drug Use" (Rosenbaum and Murphy 1991-94) and "An Ethnography of Victimization, Pregnancy and Drug Use," (Murphy 1995-98). Our goal is to explicate the ways in which pregnant drug users in the San Francisco Bay Area experienced, coped with and protected themselves from increasing stigmatization, abuse and punishment while enduring a period of fiscal retrenchment of government assistance programs.

Punishment and Prejudice: Judging Drug-Using Pregnant Women

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Throughout the late 1980's and still today, "crack moms" and "crack babies" are the subject of vigorous public debate. Much of this public discussion has been governed by speculation and medical misinformation reported as fact in both medical journals and in the popular press and has been extremely judgmental and punitive in many instances.