BLAMING MOM: Women Convicted for Bullied Son’s Suicide, Stillborn Child

October 17, 2003
By: Siobhan Morrissey, ABA Journal eReport (American Bar Association), October 17, 2003

While most states have provisions that deal with parental responsibility for the actions of their minor children, two recent cases indicate some states are expanding on that legal concept.

Controversial “cash-for-sterilization” California group comes to New York

NAPW Press Release, PRESS RELEASE, October 7, 2002

New York City, NY - CRACK (Children Require A Caring Kommunity) is a Southern California-based organization that "offers" $200 in cash to any woman or man who uses drugs or alcohol in exchange for their willingness to undergo sterilization or take long-term birth control.

National Advocates for Pregnant Women Condemns C.R.A.C.K. Campaign Targeting Methadone Clinics

National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW) released an open letter to Barbara Harris, executive director of Children Requiring a Caring Kommunity (C.R.A.C.K.) and Project Prevention, condemning a misleading statement by the organization regarding methadone treatment during pregnancy.

Criminal Prosecutions Against Pregnant Women: National Update and Overview

Criminal Prosecutions Against Pregnant Women: National Update and Overview
January 31, 1992

Download PDF file

This documents the cases of an estimated 167 women who have been arrested on criminal charges because of their behavior during pregnancy or because they became pregnant while addicted to drugs.

The Rights of Pregnant Patients: Carder Case Brings Bold Policy Initiatives

The Rights of Pregnant Patients

Carder Case Brings Bold Policy Initiatives

HealthSpan, Volume 8, Number 5, 1991

By Terry E. Thornton and Lynn Paltrow

When George Washington University Medical Center ("GWUMC") recently developed and adopted groundbreaking policies concerning the rights of pregnant patients to make health care decisions without court intervention, it not only reversed its position on the appropriateness of court-ordered medical care,' but resolved three years of daunting litigation against it for having subjected 27-year-old Angela Carder to a life threatening court-ordered Caesarean section in June 1987.1

Along the way, the Angela Carder case resulted in the only appellate decision in the country to address, on a fully developed legal record, a hospital's duty to its pregnant patients and the development of model hospital policies which protect the interests of both patient and institution alike.