NAPW’s Work Featured in Brilliant NYT Editorial Board Series

In an 8-part series, the New York Times Editorial Board squarely addresses the core issues, intersectional frameworks, and cases NAPW has been working on for more than 17 years. It recognizes NAPW's leadership in defending the rights of pregnant women.

How The War On Drugs Provides The Path To Ending The Right To Abortion

The war on drugs involves criminal laws that prohibit possession and distribution of certain substances by certain groups of people. It also responds to a public health issues (drug dependency) through the criminal law system. Laws that prohibit common human activities - such as drinking alcohol, using drugs, and having abortions have all failed to stop those activities.

CNN’s United Shades of America featuring NAPW Senior Staff Attorney Aarin M. Williams Wins an Emmy Award!

NAPW Senior Staff Attorney Aarin M. Williams appeared on CNN's "United Shades of America" where she spoke with W. Kamau Bell about intersectionality and reproductive justice and health. She explained, "If you want healthy babies then you have to take care of the woman.

NAPW: The Case of Alicia Beltran

Alicia Beltran, a 28-year-old pregnant woman, sought early prenatal care and confided in health care workers about prior use of painkillers and her efforts to end that use on her own. Instead of commending Ms. Beltran for her progress, her medical practitioners reported her to the Department of Human Services, as a result of which she was arrested on July 18, 2013 by Wisconsin law enforcement officials.

NAPW Makes Submissions to the U.N. Human Rights Council in Support of Pregnant and Parenting People

Today, NAPW along with numerous allies provided a joint submission to the United Nations, titled Criminalization and Civil Punishment of Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes and joined another joint submission, titled Reproductive Health, Rights and Justice, to inform the U.N. Human Rights Council's upcoming review of the United States on the status of human rights in our country.

Victory in Tennessee: Prosecutor Drops All Charges Against Tiffany Roberts!

On August 1, 2019, a prosecutor in Chattanooga, TN appeared in court and dropped all charges against Tiffany Roberts.

National Advocates for Pregnant Women and a coalition of Tennessee and national advocates and experts spoke out quickly and forcefully against the arrest and charges brought against Tiffany Roberts on July 23 in Chattanooga.

NAPW Activist Update: Ms. Jones is Free!

Dear Friends and Allies,

As many of you know, on June 26, a grand jury in Alabama indicted Marshae Jones for the crime of manslaughter because she experienced a pregnancy loss that she allegedly caused by being unable to protect herself from being shot in the stomach while 5 months pregnant.

Reproductive Justice and Anti Violence Statement Challenging False Claims Linking Laws Criminalizing Abortion and Related Feticide Laws with Protection of Women from Violence

Some reports following New York’s passage of the Reproductive Health Act (RHA) asserted that the RHA somehow increases the risk of gender violence. NAPW and Professor Julie Goldscheid (CUNY Law School) authored a statement challenging those claims, and other false claims linking laws criminalizing abortion and related feticide laws with protection of women from violence.

NAPW Senior Staff Attorney Amber Khan in Ms. Magazine

NAPW Senior Staff Attorney Amber Khan authored "The Crime Was Pregnancy," published in the Summer 2019 issue of Ms. Magazine. This important piece provides an update to Janet Gallagher's Ms. Magazine article "The Fetus and the Law -- Whose Life Is It Anyway," published over 35 years ago.

NAPW Open Letters in the case of Ms. Roberta J. Baker in St. Francois County, Missouri

In February 2018, Ms Roberta Baker, a mother in St. Francois County, Missouri who lost her baby around 24 hours after giving birth, was charged with felony child abuse and neglect. Ms. Baker did not receive health care during her pregnancy and birth because she did not have a health care provider she could access or trust.