NAPW Activist Update– No Going Back!

Dear Friends and Allies,

Our New Year was off to a rousing start with the publication of the New York Times editorial series, "A Woman's Rights." It brought attention to NAPW cases, clients, and framing, and helped push New York's legislators to pass the Reproductive Health Act (RHA). Below please find updates about the RHA, NAPW's staff, work, and how you can help.

The New York Times Series ” A Woman’s Rights” (DOWNLOAD PDFs)

The New York Times Series " A Woman's Rights"
March 11, 2019
The New York Times Editorial Board published the groundbreaking series "A Woman's Rights" on December 28, 2018. Please find the entire series here.

You can read each part of the series and download individual PDFs below:

Download Intro: A Woman's Rights

Download Part 1: When Prosecutors Jail a Mother for a Miscarriage

Download Part 2: The Feticide Playbook, Explained

Download Part 3: The Cost of Complacency About Roe

Download Part 4: Slandering the Unborn

Download Part 5: The Mothers Society Condemns

Download Part 6: Can a Corpse Give Birth?

Download Part 7: How My Stillbirth Became a Crime

Download Part 8: The Future of Personhood Nation

Whole Woman’s Health (US Supreme Court)

Abortion Restrictions and Women’s Liberty: Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt ( NAPW and the NYU Law School Reproductive Justice Clinic organized and filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of 14 organizations in this pivotal case challenging Texas laws that would have undermined the right to choose abortion and severely restricted women’s access to abortion services in that state.

Home Abortion Attempt (TN)

Tennessee v. Anna Yocca

Anna Yocca was accused of attempting to terminate her pregnancy at home with a coat hanger. She presented at an emergency department and was admitted to the hospital. Some days later she consented to having cesarean surgery and gave birth to a premature baby.

Woman Prosecuted for Seeking to End Her Own Pregnancy (GA)

Georgia v. Kenlissia Jones

In 2015, Kenlissia Jones was arrested and held without bond in Georgia on the charge of "malice murder" for allegedly using the drug misoprostol to have an abortion at home, outside of a medical setting. After NAPW and local allies spoke out again st the arrest, the County prosecutor concluded that there existed no legal grounds in Georgia for charging a pregnant woman with murder for terminating her own pregnancy (and issued a press release to that effect). While the murder charge against Ms. Jones was dropped and she was released from jail, this occurred only after she had endured the trauma of an arrest, incarceration for several days, and violation of her rights to medical and personal privacy.

Concealing Birth and Abuse of Corpse Charges Based on Taking Labor-Inducing Medication (AR)

Arkansas v. Anne Bynum

NAPW represented Anne Bynum as counsel on her successful direct criminal appeal. In Arkansas, local law enforcement alleged that Ms. Bynum took misoprostol pills to induce an abortion (although in fact she planned to deliver the baby, and had an adoption plan in place) . Her pregnancy ended in a stillbirth late at night while she was in her home . Following the stillbirth, she safeguarded the remains and slept for several hours before helping to get her son ready and off to school.